P4 Blog

  • February 19, 2014

    In part one of this series we discussed that Perforce enables use of both Git and P4 simultaneously. Users do not have to be forced to choose one tool or workflow. The support is seamless and is unique in the industry. Unlike other solutions, only Perforce can serve as a Git master, serving both Git and P4 requests, instead of just bidirectional synching with a remote Git repository. Here are answers to common questions that we come across.

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  • February 19, 2014

    We see plenty of debate on the use of Git versus Perforce for version management across the web. People debate the workflows each enables, the value of one large repo versus 100s of smaller ones, and of course, performance.

    We find it interesting that people are surprised that Git doesn’t demolish Perforce in performance tests. We built the Perforce versioning engine for speed and scale.

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  • February 18, 2014

     

     

    And merging. Whether you do it connected or disconnected, we'd like to know what you really need from Perforce. Take our 5 minute survey and get your voice heard.

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  • February 14, 2014

     

     

    We recently commissioned an independent study on Continuous Delivery. Now, some of you may be asking, “what is this so called ‘Continuous Delivery’ and why do I care?”

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  • February 12, 2014

     

    Perforce sponsors an event called “Monki Gras”, a two-day long software development conference run by analyst firm RedMonk (www.redmonk.com) in London. The event this year was held in the Village Hall in Shoreditch under the topic “Sharing Craft” - and I was lucky enough to be able to attend and represent Perforce.

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  • February 11, 2014

     

    Git is awesome for the type of problem it's good for. Relatively small groups of people, working on human-scale projects made up of text, code, and other small, easily-mergeable files, with no fine-grained read access control. If you want to start an open-source project, or a company internal "two-pizza team" that works like an open-source project, then git is a good choice.

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