P4 Blog

  • February 03, 2017

    Just a quick post to announce that I have pushed P4Python 2016.2 to package repository PyPi and asked the web team to put it on the web and FTP sites as well.

    There are not many changes in this release, but two of them are important:

    We have updated OpenSSL from 1.0.1 to 1.0.2k, which includes the latest security patches. This applies both to the binary releases (i.e., pip wheels and MSI installers for Windows) and the source build on Linux (see this post for an explanation).

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  • January 31, 2017

    I love the Python package manager pip. It used to be hard work to install the right packages for Python, especially when dealing with dependencies between different packages. One of the best features of pip is that it comes with a binary package format called wheels that allows me to deliver my binary extensions to Python in a very convenient way.

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  • January 25, 2017

    Perforce Natively Integrates with Amazon Lumberyard for Game Dev_Image

    Cloud computing has spilled a lot of virtual ink in its first decade. It seems like every week there’s some new announcement about moving data to the cloud, applications to the cloud, even entire infrastructures to the cloud. Perhaps it should come as no surprise then that game development and multiplayer gaming in particular are heading that way as well.

  • January 24, 2017

    A few years ago, I posted a blog article on how you can add colors to the P4 command line. This involved a lot of hacking, administrator access and a specialised P4 executable for Windows to work, as well as a modified journal file. Not for the faint of heart or, as the post stated: Here be dragons.

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  • January 19, 2017

    Introduction

    Today I’m writing in response to a recent article entitled “Splunk: Why we dumped Perforce for Atlassian’s Bitbucket of Gits”, primarily because it offers a great opportunity to correct a variety of misconceptions regarding Perforce Helix. The TLDR version is that the article contains several factual inaccuracies, and Splunk’s main complaint about Helix is simply no longer valid.

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  • January 19, 2017

    In gaming, where development teams vary in size, scope, and direction, version control platforms must cater to wildly disparate operations. Because whether the game being constructed is a once-in-a-generation title or an in-house release from an independent studio, the change management and file versioning must be ironclad. 

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